Hillary Clinton has been fighting for women, children, and families since she began her career.

Here’s what she’s accomplished on their behalf.

Hillary Clinton has been fighting for women, children, and families since she began her career.

Here’s what she’s accomplished on their behalf.

Now that she’s secured the Democratic nomination, Hillary Clinton is poised to be the first woman elected president in American history—and one who has dedicated her decades-long career to fighting for children and families.

From her earliest days as a young lawyer to her trips around the world as secretary of state, Hillary has taken on her share of tough fights. Here are just a few of the biggest things she’s accomplished.

1973: Hillary graduated Yale Law and began her career at the Children’s Defense Fund

Hillary Clinton has been fighting for women, children, and families since she began her career.

Instead of signing on to a prestigious law firm after graduating, Hillary went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund—shaping her burgeoning career around the fundamental need for quality public education for every American child, regardless of their background, location, or unique needs. She worked with teenagers incarcerated in adult prisons in South Carolina and families with children with disabilities in Massachusetts. It sparked a lifelong passion for helping children live up to their potential.

1983: As first lady of Arkansas, Hillary helped bring reform to Arkansas public schools

When she was appointed to the Arkansas Education Standards Committee, Hillary crossed the state, investigating public schools, listening to parents and teachers, and working with a team of educators to create policy that would better prepare Arkansas students for a 21st-century economy. And earlier, she co-founded the Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, which would later make huge strides in standing up for children in the welfare system.

1995: As first lady of the United States, Hillary boldly declared “women’s rights are human rights” in Beijing

Hillary Clinton has been fighting for women, children, and families since she began her career.

Standing in front of a U.N. conference and declaring that “women’s rights are human rights” was more controversial than it sounds today. Many within the U.S. government didn’t want Hillary to go to Beijing. Others wanted her to pick a less polarizing topic (you say polarizing, we say half the population). But Hillary was determined to speak out about human rights abuses, and her message became a rallying cry for a generation.

1997: Hillary worked with Republicans and Democrats to secure health care for millions of American kids.

As first lady of the United States, Hillary fought to help pass health care reform. When that effort failed, she didn’t give up: Hillary worked with Republicans and Democrats to help create the Children’s Health Insurance Program. CHIP cut the uninsured rate of American children by half, and today it provides health care to more than 8 million kids.

2000: Hillary wrote legislation to improve education and children’s health care in America

As a U.S. senator, Hillary helped write legislation to recruit and retain high-quality educators, improve the safety of pediatric medication, and promote quality education in developing countries. And she’s still fighting to give every child the chance to reach his or her full potential.

2004: Hillary fought for immigration reform—and to keep immigrant families together

Hillary Clinton has been fighting for women, children, and families since she began her career.

As U.S. senator from New York, Hillary supported comprehensive immigration reform legislation, and she co-sponsored the DREAM Act three times. And she worked to expand health care access for low-income immigrant mothers and children.

2009: Hillary stood up against the exploitation of women and girls around the world as secretary of state

As secretary of state, Hillary made human rights—including women’s rights—a cornerstone of her foreign policy. She worked to bring down barriers that stop women and girls from reaching their potential—standing up against sex trafficking; helping women gain access to markets, credit, and training; and leading the fight for a U.N. Security Council resolution to combat sexual violence against women and children in conflict zones.

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